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Habitat PopUp

#events #exhibition #mutations of the built environment

// Géraldine Kerboëthau

Urban densification means our habitat has to adapt to changing lifestyles. The timber-framed PopUp Habitat reconsiders the uses and functions of housing and offers users a modular living space. Each module is reversible and customizable – from the walls to the furniture – for maximum optimisation of the existing buildings in which it is integrated.

“Interested in the optimisation of the existing built environment, and the preservation and interior refurbishment of historical architecture, Géraldine decided to take a closer look at Haussmanian style […]. Haussmanian characteristics, primarily based on over-dimensioning and the use of public areas for moving around the building, represent a restrictive framework but, above all, a great source of inspiration. […] In an age where housing is seen as a service and no longer just as private property, Géraldine has designed a pop-up system: an easy-to-install interior architecture which can be used in individual rooms. […] The principle plays with different heights and light by providing split-level interiors, with connecting walkways and a flexible and open structure. The main strength of this project is its understanding of how conceptual creativity is always accompanied by practical creativity, closely linked to use and place. It’s a way of breaking away from the principle of class gradations initially proposed by Baron Haussmann who saw aesthetics as a parallel to the social standing of the occupants.”


Christine Vignaud, course leader Sustainable Cities

Designer(s)

Géraldine began her training with a diploma in Interior Design and Environmental Design at LISAA. She then joined the International Class at L’École de design on the Global Design course before pursuing the Mutations of the Built Environment master’s program. Her internships at MYGG Design in Milan then at Volcan Design in Paris confirmed her career choice as a junior interior designer. Géraldine is particularly keen on the work of architect Sou Fujimoto for his user-oriented approach and flexibility at the heart of the architectural process.
“Imagining tomorrow’s architecture makes us reconsider our lives and our societies. And nature plays a major role in this thought process.”

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