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Dysland Quest

careeventeventsLivier Ortiz-Anaya

Designer(s)

Livier Ortiz Anaya


A graduate in industrial design from the Facultad del Hábitat, UASLP in Mexico, Livier worked as a project manager in decoration in an agency then for 3M before joining the Sustainable Innovation master’s program at L’École de design. She carried out her final degree internship at L’Oréal’s Research and Innovation Centre at Chevilly-Larue, where she explored the philosophy of user-centred innovation. Livier would like to pursue her career promoting economic autonomy and social change through design while developing sustainable systems.

 

The project presented by Mikaël Le Tohic, MDes Course Leader: Care

Intended for children with dyslexic difficulties, Dysland Quest is a board game designed to help motivate children to do their homework. Through the exploration and redefinition of the user experience, homework becomes fun. The physical and technical relaxation activities in the game turn homework into a mission to be accomplished. The game is based on social interaction and sharing and helps children and parents overcome the tensions caused by dyslexia when doing homework.

“Livier’s project looks at educational support for dyslexic children, ways of taking into account their differences and the exchange of information between the school and the family unit. Her study of this learning population, as well as normative or experimental teaching methods in the school, study routines in the household, medical diagnoses and therapies related to the child’s learning difficulties, allowed her to observe the fixed (or even closed) postures of all the actors concerned. Livier has managed to put the child back at the heart of the project, whilst bringing about a change in attitude of professionals. The missions carried out in the game are noted in the “homework/correspondence book” for the assessment and exchanges between the child, parents and teachers. The innovation lies in the capacity to put the actors in a caring and fun role. The solution is a very relevant one which takes away the stigma of dyslexia:the child feels valued and becomes a proactive player in gaining new skills.”


Gaël Guilloux, director of Care Design Lab